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about civil-rights. the second part of your question, how did he get kennedy -- it takes a lot of pages in this book to talk about all the things he does but the thing he does on the instant, this bill appears to be totally dead. he says didn't someone file a discharge petition? discharge petition had been filed -- this bill was in a committee that was never going to let it out. wasn't even the senate. still in the house rules committee which was shared by judge howard w. smith and would even give a date. the bill was going nowhere. johnson remembers someone filed a discharge petition to take away from that committee. that was -- a discharge petition ever -- never passed. violation of house rules and no president had ever gotten behind one before. johnson calls the representative who introduces it and representative of missouri has been told by the leaders dropped this thing and listen to johnson in this telephone call to see a genius in human nature because the first half of the call, we can't violate the house pre ♪ >> this is book tv's live coverage of the national books s festival
program, civil-rights and everyone of his major -- was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress, to see him get that program up and running and has it, ramming it through. to watch lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he not only knows all the levers to pull but has the will. in lyndon johnson's case almost vicious drive to do it, to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i do the research look what he is doing. look what he is doing here. i don't say i succeeded but i tried to explain that in my books. to me, to see him doing that is something that is not only fascinating but revelatory given true insight into how power works in washington. there is another reason i don't get tired of doing these books on lyndon johnson. you are always learning something new. that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about a thousand or ten thousand times already as the case in the centerpiece of this book, the assassination of presid
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
comments like that. he's proved her right. remember when rand paul came out against the civil rights act and then had to take it back when running for senate? remember how bad that was for him? did you hear what todd akin just said? stay with us. that's coming up. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! >>> i want to thank them for their help as well. and just in case anybody watching throughout the country, they are both available. no, no, no. only kidding, only kidding. only kidding, only kidding. ariana definitely is not available but ailer is. >> stop. >> this is ariana and this is ayla. i can see i'm going to get in trouble when i get home. >> that was scott brown the night he won the special election to fill the massachusetts senate seat two and a half years ago. right now in trying to get reelected, he faces a deficit among wome
paul came out against the civil rights act and then had to take it back when running for senate? remember how bad that was for him? did you hear what todd akin just said? stay with us. that's coming up. machine [ humming ] [ humming ] [ male announcer ] kraft macaroni & cheese. you know you love it. >>> i want to thank them for their help as well. and just in case anybody watching throughout the country, they are both available. no, no, no. only kidding, only kidding. only kidding, only kidding. ariana definitely is not available but ayla is. >> stop. >> this is ariana and this is ayla. i can see i'm going to get in trouble when i get home. >> that was scott brown the night he won the special election to fill the massachusetts senate seat two and a half years ago. right now in trying to get reelected, he faces a deficit among women voters of about 12 points. interestingly though, the most politically damaging thing about that awkward introduction to the national political universe might not have been what mr. brown said about his daughters while they tried to make him stop, but
to be mayor of san francisco? how about a mayor from the civil rights academy of harvey milk? we would be proud of that. i want to welcome everybody back. i know you had a great summer. i want you to approach this school like a sponge, soak up everything that you can learn. it is great to have knowledge about everything going on in the world, what is going on in the city. by the way, i will be supporting your parents and teachers and faculty to make this the best school in san francisco. how about that? [applause] and you are starting out fantastic. this is what san francisco is about. all the parents involved children and faculty to make this the best school. you have a mayor that will pay attention to our school, education, make sure you get the best education, because i want you to have my job some day. how about that? welcome back, welcome to the great school of harvey milk. you have a wonderful faculty who is going to teach you and expose you to a lot of different things to keep you active. we are going to help the city make sure your after-school programs are solid. thank you and
: one of the things, juan, she brings up is absolutely true. when you look at the civil rights movement -- you've written about this as well. where was al gore's father? who were did lyndon johnson count on to get the civil rights and voting rights act passed? it seems like the narrative that is being pushed -- i'll even say the president and his campaign this time, we're going to put y'all back in chains, romney is a racist. an obama truth team member said this is a false narrative about conservatives, that they're racists. i resent it. it's not true. al gore's father voted against the civil rights act. a former clansman was a part of the democratic party in the senate. this is a false narrative. do you agree? >> there's lots that's false. in fact when i heard ann was accused of bull feathers, we'll say here this evening, i thought what, you know, ann has stake. i'm reading ann's book. i wrote "eyes on the prize." i know a lot about the civil rights movement. i wrote a biography about marshall. when you look at reconstruction, antilynching laws early in the part of the 20th century, re
for civil rights. "america's unwritten constitution" he's professor of law at the yale law school. president for the alliance of justice system. it is wonderful to have you here. this week, we have two blockbuster political events on the calendar. the first presidential debate and the return of the supreme court to washington. they will hear arguments since the first time on the affordable care act. a start and fresh reminder of the power of the court. the court returns with a docket packed with high profile cases and others likely to be heard. it's strangely almost entirely absent from the presidential campaign. it becomes alarming when you look at the age of the justices. 76, 76, 74, and the oldest is 79 years old. let's not forget she's the fifth vote to uphold a decision in roe v. wade. >> i hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution. it will be my impression they will reverse row v. wade. >> it's very likely the next president of the united states will appoint several justices to the supreme court. that often is the most lasting legacy of
the bedrock for the modern civil rights movement. >> the civil rights lawyer who argued the brown versus brown of education came would eventually become part of the warren courtment thurgood marshall would serve as a supreme court justice for 31 years. in 1992 a year after he was retired marshall was honored by the nation's lawyers at an event here in the bay area. george watson reported. >> reporter: the american bar association honored retired supreme court justice thurgood marshall with its highest award. marshall will receive the award tomorrow. where did it all begin? in 1933, marshall received his law degree. his naacp, he fought for the civil rights of black americans. but what marked his time in history was the 1954 landmark case brown versus board of education. the supreme court struck down the separate but equal doctrine opening the way for integration of schools. but president eisenhower still called for patient on the issue of integration. >> i personally believe if you try to go too far too fast in laws in this delegate field, that has involved the emotions of so many millions of
, they do have a lot to feel guilty for. it was liberal democrats that were the ones fighting civil rights for 100 years after the civil war in addition to fighting the civil war. and they just write these revisionist histories and then play act themselves being civil rights champions. um, i mean, the quote from bill clinton. on his first inaugural as governor, he was embracing orville -- [inaudible] who stood in the schoolhouse during little rock. democrat bill clinton invites democrat segregationist jay william full bright to the white house to give him the medal of freedom in which he cites fulbright, you know, he teaches us that the russians are people too. but fulbright didn't ever see that black americans were people, too, since he signed the southern manifesto, voted against the '64 civil rights act. cheryl: you really in the book go after politicians, and you say they have used the black community to their own benefit. >> oh, yes. cheryl: give me some specific examples. >> well, that's the funny thing. while being pompous and engaging in this moral training as if they are the champ
over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and...
motivated your interest in politics? >> i guess i have always been passionate about civil rights and equality for everyone, and i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality and other issues, but i guess i have always been someone that is vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, and having to listen to many perspectives before making key decisions. as an activist in chinatown, i have always felt that working families and people who work in our neighborhoods need to have much more support. it is always about giving more voice to immigrants or the underserved and workers in the city. that is what drives my passion as a supervisor. >> tell me about the process of running for supervisor. what did you learn from the campaign process? was anything surprising? supervisor mar: i had to move from being a regular person that barely gets his kid to school on time and makes her a healthy lunch to having to go to a photo opportunities. i was on the school board for eight years, i had some training. and i was in the democratic party cen
school board is cutting a deal with the feds to end a civil rights investigation. the board says african-american students make up 32% of the student population. they account for 63% of all suspensions. this spring, the department of education's office for civil rights looked into the school district and if they treated black students more harshly than white students. the district agreed to make changes to the zero tolerance policy for the next five years. >>> marla, the albany middle school teacher accused of lewd act was a child is set to appear in a courtroom this afternoon. about 100 parents packed the library at the school to find out more about the arrest of james azumasaki. he was arrested in his albany home on wednesday morning on suspension of lewd acts with a child under 14. >> a very delicate situation of an arrest being made and allegation being made, but no charges as of yet. you have to be very careful when you talk to kids and when you talk to parents. >> now substitute teacher is teaching azusumaki's class. the school will redistribute among other classrooms. >>> morgan h
of civil rights in this country, and we have some blockbuster cases being heard by the supreme court. one of those cases involves a permanent action. abigail fisher applied to the diversity of texas and was denied admission. the university has a policy of along the top 10% of the academic performance to be automatically eligible to go into the class. for the percentage of the remainder, race is one of the criteria. fisher is suing because she was denied admission. that case will decide the future of racial preferences in this country. that is one of the leading cases being heard. the voting rights, a challenge to the voting rights act. this is our most critically important civil-rights statute ever enacted in this country. the court may accept a challenge to this statute, enacted in law in 1965, renewed as recently as 2006, by an overwhelming number of democratic and republican members of congress. there are some who basically want to gut the voting rights act. and then finally, the other set of huge cases involve cave rights -- gay rights, a challenge to the defense of marriage statutes,
before civil rights. what we see is a switch to the entitlement state and the destruction of the black family. the removal of the black man. the government will give you your benefits and control them -- >> david, let me tell you this. you and i agree -- david, you and i gray on this point -- [overlapping dialogue] >> what are the numbers of children born to black families, two-parent families in the civil rights era? in the fight for civil rights, versus today from 80% to 83% in the opposite direction. that tells you something about liberalism. >> sean: we will be talking about it i am sure in the days to come. don't forget, "hannity" tomorrow night, following the debate in denver, live from the spin room, 11:00 p.m. and still to come, liz chain cheney -- liz cheney on what has been suspected on the benghazi attack on 9/11 was spontaneous or unexpected. ambassador stevens knew he was in danger. nothing was done by the obama white house. we will >> tonight, there is new informs on the ongoing coverup by the obama administration over the terror anac benghazi. the house oversight committ
of people had no reason to love e 'fifty, the civil rights bills and, you couldn't ta -- you couldn't do it on route 40. let me bring this up. it seems like joe biden is a familiar fige 60 years ago. barack obama, of course, has an exotic name, an african name. he's not an unusual fellow. heeems lika person you wou hang out with, play go wit thesaren str onie leonets moomn, regular -- someone you would have met 100 years ago. are the democratic party, the new age that they scare people? i just don't see that myself. maybe i'm part of that reality. i don't see them as strange at all. >> chris, it goes back to the propaganda factor. it's not just that rush and fox and those guys say something, it's that we say the other thing. if we say that barack obama isn't a muslim, that must not true because we're the liberal media, we're the mainstream media, and nothing we can say -- we say can be trusted. >> i have called an anti-posture for years. just saying no to everything. thank you, guys. i thk you nailed it. it'ssychological. anyway, howard fineman and joe klein, thank you. coming up, could
in the civil rights movement is coming to d.c. host to the's browns. officialtory is the back onto theing field. pamela howze: it just seems like such an... infringement on our lives. how dare they step into my life that way. it's none of their business. he's trying to restricus, again. he's taking us backwards. george allen is the last thing we need in washington. anncr: the democratic senatorial campaign committee is... responsible for the content of this advertising. your share of obama's debt is over 50 thousand dollars, and it grows every day. obama's policies are making it harder on women. the poverov rate for women -- the highest in 17 years. more women are unemployed under president obama. more than five and a half million women can't find work. that's what obama's policies have done for women. welcome, daughter. [ romney ] i'm mitt romney and i approve this message. >> 55 years ago, a group of r theirs stood up fo an education. >> now the african-american is getting pieces of history from the youngest of those pioneers. greta kreuz has the story. >> september, 1957, black students inte
memoirs. he says it will trace his life from growing up poor and the south to his years as a civil rights politician. he will not shy away. >> that will be a good read. the man has stories to tell. >> i think it will be a best seller. >> abc 7 goes one on one with a woman who >> good morning washington. i am jacqui jeras. did you wake up early from the storms? we are still dealing with that at this hour. ride along the corridor getting ready to cross the potomac another strong thunderstorms. none of these are severe, but they are putting down heavy rain. if you can hold off heading out the door, i would do so. it will probably miss with traffic a little. manassas has just about 1.7 inches of rain. bristow just under 1 inch. the forecast for today, partly sunny and 67 degrees. 74 degrees by noon. most of the day dry again. we will see storms redevelop late in the day. how about it, angela? >> we are dealing with quite a few trouble spots out there. we've mentioned the word zone on i-95 in virginia toward frederiksberg between 17 and route 3 out of the way. they are getting that out of the
identity theft. we talk about hate-crimes. we talk about civil rights issues. but the one thing that absolutely everybody talks about, the one thing that they care the most about, the one thing that seems to cause the most worry and the most concern and the most pain for everybody, anybody, in northern california and in the bay area is the issue of bullying. it's a heartbreaking thing. levels of bullying in our community, children doing it to other children is just all too common. it's completely heartbreaking. it's heartbreaking to children. it's heartbreaking to their parents and their families and it's heartbreaking to their teachers. it's heartbreaking to everybody. it's the one thing that has come up in almost every conversation i have had with people and that is what leds us here today to spread the word to spread the message and to bring people on board with anti-bullying. and that is what you are part of here today. so we really do appreciate you coming. what we're starting here today, as richard said, is with a screening of a documentary film called "bully." by the di
lee has dedicated his entire professional life to public service and civil rights. before serving as our mayor he had important roles in city of government and served as the executive director of the san francisco human rights commission and he worked as an attorney for the asian law caucasus which is a very important organization in the bay area. throughout his career, his entire career, mayor lee has demonstrated an unwaivering commitment to the people of this great city and to our community. and he honors us with his presence here today. ladies and gentlemen, mayor ed lee. [ applause ] >> hello everybody ! >> hello. ?2<&8.k,vr u.s. attorney melinda haigh for that wonderful introduction and richard carranza and mr. hirsch, but the no. 1 thing we care about you, we care about and your future and where you are going. when you get out of school being san franciscoans we'll have the best jobs in the world waiting for you. everyone one of you, how about that for san francisco? [ applause ] all right. well, let me start out by saying we're here in herbs theater. you have to know t
secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 203rd 1991. please welcome justice thomas and professor mark to the stage. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and tennant love for that extra nearly gracious, warm welcome. thank you for the national archives and the staff for making this event possible. thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitutional accountability center and thank you, justice thomas and off for being with us today as we mark the 225th birthday of our constitution. i guess i would like to start that conversation with the words the constitution starts with. we, the people. what that phrase means to you, how that freeze has changed over time thanks to the amendments and other developments. who is this we? when did folks like you when i become part of this? >> well, obviou
in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year very slowly and were reaffirmed and reshaped in the appropriations and budget legislation. families, people came to trust
than our century's worth of progress in civil rights. now the tide is turning. inch by inch, state by state, we've been reclaiming our rights and turning back the wave of voter suppression. we saw it when the justice department stepped in to block the laws in texas, south carolina and florida. we saw it when governors in six states all but one were democrats, vetoed voter i.d. laws. they were champions of democracy to do so. and we saw it when state and federal courts rejected laws in eight states, including today's major ruling in pennsylvania. this morning a judge blocked pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. from going into effect before the november election. after it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of voters face the real pocket that they would not be allowed to vote. but now this unjust law will not be in effect on election day in this critical swing state. it's a stunning rebuke to republicans and their shameless attempt to rig the system. just remember one of those state top gop lawmakers slipped up and said what these laws are all about. >> voter i.d., which is g
in child labor laws? is he against the civil rights bill for public accommodations where you can't close your bathrooms to black people? what kind of laws is this guy for? apparently nothing. >> well, i think that you're probably onto something there, but the notion -- >> it sounds like his principle is don't mess with business on anything. >> i think that the notion that it would be -- that it is interfering with someone's freedom to say to them you can't discriminate against someone that is doing the same work just because they're a woman. you know, we've had an outpouring of support in the last 48 hours. claire mccaskill.com, people are coming there and they're really jazzed up about this notion that i was -- that i'm not ladylike. i am a fater, chris. i'm proud to be a fighter for missouri families and there's a lot at stake in this election and believe me, it's not over. missouri will be tough, this will be close. >> did you ever have a defense attorney say to you when you're putting a bad guy in prison, you're not being ladylike there? you just did your job. this is not a hard one
the ranks of al qaeda, presiding over a civil rights revolution, and then enjoying the fruits of the recovery. with me now is "newsweek's" andrew sullivan, also editor of "the dish" and also joining me is ari melber, a correspondent for "the nation." gentlemen, thank you. our main focus is on you and your big brain, andrew, my friend, because it's hard for me to figure out what "newsweek" has been doing the last few months because every front cover is different from the other one. one trashes obama. this one brilliantly i think celebrates the potential of a certain election result. give me your sense, how you got into this idea of even thinking about the next four years given all our focus here at "hardball" and elsewhere on what's going to happen in six weeks. >> because he, the president, has been thinking about it for four years already, and if you have watched him carefully, you have seen he's always played a long game, and part of that long game was always re-election. most presidents deal with the middle east in the last two years. he started his first go. he inherited t
ever complaining about ministers who are involved in the civil rights movement or in the anti- vietnam war demonstrations or about black preachers who've been so involved in american politics. is it only conservative ministers that you object to? >> no. what i object to -- [applause] -- what i object to -- what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek to use the power of government to impose it on others. a minister who is in civil rights or in the conservative movement, because he believes his faith instructs him to do that, i admire. the fact that the faith speaks to us and that we are moral people, hopefully, i accept and rejoice in. it's when you try to use that to undermine the integrity of private political -- or private religious faith and the use of the state is where -- for the most personal decisions in american life -- that's where i draw the line. >> thank you. now, mr. president, rebuttal. >> yes, it's very difficult to rebut, because i find myself in so much agreement with mr. mondale. i, too, want that
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 332 (some duplicates have been removed)